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Ardmore is a typical distillery in the Speyside region of Scotland, but it produces some far from typical malt.

It has been functioning since 1898, when it was first built by William Teacher’s son Adam.

It was created with the sole purpose of bolstering supplies for the Teacher’s Blend itself, and remains the main component of Teacher’s Highland Cream today.

However, it has gone on to great things and has now been released as a single malt as well.

Ardmore Legacy was released last year with the aim to replace Ardmore Traditional Cask as the distillery’s flagship malt.

It is unique amongst both the Highland and Speyside Whiskies as being the only traditionally peated version and is made of 80% peat and 20% unpeated malt.

The packaging is something to be admired.  It captures both the tradition of the regions as a map on the label, as well as the modern outlook of the brand, with copper detailing of the distillery’s insignia, an eagle.

The white and black background with only minimal colour really makes the bottle stand out from the every-day dark earthy tones that seem common on Whisky bottles.

The flavour profile of this dram is also something that makes it stand out.

Ardmore Legacy is able to capture both the mellow, floral notes of Speyside malt and combine them with a lightly peated note that is perhaps more common to coastal Highlanders.

The nose takes a decidedly aromatic note, with heather and herbs on an earth toned background.  There is the scent of dewy grass covered in light peated notes that makes this dram alluring to the senses.

The palate is a journey through these flavours and is reminiscent of the oak barrel at the same time.  the flavour becomes slightly sweeter, with more of a sugary, syrupy thickness to it.

The heather notes intertwine with more fruity flavours, such as apples and pears.  This is all tied together with the delicate peat that floats in the background.

The tang of the peat smoke is then complemented wonderfully with lemons and limes that really make the smoke pop out on the taste buds.

The peat is the lasting flavour on the finish that lingers for the perfect amount of time.  There is also a slight nod towards more honey and heather.

The latest release from Ardmore Distillery is also a fantastic dram and sits well within the Ardmore range.

This is the Port Cask finish, an expression that was released this month and is a testament to the quality of Ardmore mats.

This is a much sweeter malt than Legacy and is packed with summer fruits and berries.  If you ever find yourself longing to be back in the arms of summer as winter drags on, then this is the malt that will take you there.

The nose is brimming with citrus fruits, red berries and ripe apples.  To top it all off there is a great vanilla spiciness that becomes a soft cinnamon flavur as you continue to appreciate it.

These flavours find themselves blossoming on the palate.  The fruits become an orchard of all sorts of offerings, with a hint of peat smoke in the background.

The smoke really brings out the spice and the tang of the fruit, emphasising the flavours and allowing them to be compared in all their glory.

The oak barrels come through in a honey and vanilla sweetness that is dusted with cinnamon and nutmeg.

The finish is dry and lingering, with some sparks left from the peat smoke and of course, that sweet fruitin

It has been functioning since 1898, when it was first built by William Teacher’s son Adam.

It was created with the sole purpose of bolstering supplies for the Teacher’s Blend itself, and remains the main component of Teacher’s Highland Cream today.

However, it has gone on to great things and has now been released as a single malt as well.

Ardmore Legacy was released last year with the aim to replace Ardmore Traditional Cask as the distillery’s flagship malt.

It is unique amongst both the Highland and Speyside Whiskies as being the only traditionally peated version and is made of 80% peat and 20% unpeated malt.

The packaging is something to be admired.  It captures both the tradition of the regions as a map on the label, as well as the modern outlook of the brand, with copper detailing of the distillery’s insignia, an eagle.

The white and black background with only minimal colour really makes the bottle stand out from the every-day dark earthy tones that seem common on Whisky bottles.

The flavour profile of this dram is also something that makes it stand out.

Ardmore Legacy is able to capture both the mellow, floral notes of Speyside malt and combine them with a lightly peated note that is perhaps more common to coastal Highlanders.

The nose takes a decidedly aromatic note, with heather and herbs on an earth toned background.  There is the scent of dewy grass covered in light peated notes that makes this dram alluring to the senses.

The palate is a journey through these flavours and is reminiscent of the oak barrel at the same time.  the flavour becomes slightly sweeter, with more of a sugary, syrupy thickness to it.

The heather notes intertwine with more fruity flavours, such as apples and pears.  This is all tied together with the delicate peat that floats in the background.

The tang of the peat smoke is then complemented wonderfully with lemons and limes that really make the smoke pop out on the taste buds.

The peat is the lasting flavour on the finish that lingers for the perfect amount of time.  There is also a slight nod towards more honey and heather.

The latest release from Ardmore Distillery is also a fantastic dram and sits well within the Ardmore range.

This is the Port Cask finish, an expression that was released this month and is a testament to the quality of Ardmore mats.

This is a much sweeter malt than Legacy and is packed with summer fruits and berries.  If you ever find yourself longing to be back in the arms of summer as winter drags on, then this is the malt that will take you there.

The nose is brimming with citrus fruits, red berries and ripe apples.  To top it all off there is a great vanilla spiciness that becomes a soft cinnamon flavur as you continue to appreciate it.

These flavours find themselves blossoming on the palate.  The fruits become an orchard of all sorts of offerings, with a hint of peat smoke in the background.

The smoke really brings out the spice and the tang of the fruit, emphasising the flavours and allowing them to be compared in all their glory.

The oak barrels come through in a honey and vanilla sweetness that is dusted with cinnamon and nutmeg.

The finish is dry and lingering, with some sparks left from the peat smoke and of course, that sweet fruitin

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