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Timorous Beastie whisky review
77%Overall Score
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In celebration of the great bard of Scotland, Rabbie Burns, Douglas Laing have created a dram to capture the true spirit of his poetry.

Timorous Beastie is the Whisky embodiment of Burns’ ode “To A Mouse”, but is certainly not timid.

This continues in Douglas Laing’s tradition of taking Scottish symbols and turning them into quality Whiskies.  See Big Peat and Scallywag for further reference!

Timorous Beastie is a Highland malt blended from several different distilleries, including Glen Garioch, Dalmore and Glengoyne.

Unlike the mouse in Burns’ poem, this dram is big hearted and ready for anything.  It is full bodied and does not shy away from flavour, giving you a bold experience of Highland malts.

The nose opens with a burst of sweetness.  It is a bouquet of boiled sweets and honeyed heather notes, with plenty of summer berries and white grapes.

There is a slight tang to the berry flavour, which is then complemented by a wonderfully warm sherry note.  The barrels can definitely be tasted and give a good depth to bolster the main flavours.

Behind the sweetness is a subtle but distinct note of sea air.  This combines well with the honey and the coastal Highland malts can be detected.

On the palate the oak of the barrels mixes with the honey and results in a mouth watering vanilla note.

The palate is also filled with a biscuity base that is a great flavour for the summer berries and fruit to clash with.  These flavours are opposites but work in harmony to give you a well-rounded taste of the Highlands.

The sea air also becomes a lot more apparent, with oily rope and brine coming in.  This goes perfectly with the heather notes that appear every now and again.

The fruit flavours become drier and raisins and apricots take the lead.

The finish brings together the biscuit and malt tones with the cinnamon spice of the nose.  This is definitely not a timid dram!

 

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